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HOWTO_D-Link_DP-100_HW_Printerserver_and_others


This article is part of the HOWTO series.
Installation Kernel & Hardware Networks Portage Software System X Server Gaming Non-x86 Emulators Misc

Contents

Introduction

This is a HOWTO on getting the D-Link DP-100 printserver to play along with Cups. You might want to note that its pretty much the same for every printserver using lpd - so you could try these same instructions if you have a slightly different model.

Emerge needed applications

emerge cups foomatic foomatic-db foomatic-filters

You actually only need cups, but drivers are always useful :)

Start cups

/etc/init.d/cups start

Find out your print servers IP

This is pretty important, since we kindof need to talk to the print server :)

Using nmap

Assuming you have nmap installed, its a simple matter of scanning your network, like so:

nmap -sP 192.168.0.0/24

Using arp on the linux DHCP server

Yet another way:

arp -a

For now, we're going to assume its 192.168.0.5.

Configuring Cups

Creating a Printer

Fire up your favorite browser, and head to http://localhost:631 (Replace localhost with the IP where your cups server lives. Note that you have to edit cups.conf for the remote server to allow access to the admin interface).

Choose "Manage Printers", and then "Add Printer". It will ask you for a password - give itthe root uname/pword.

In the address field, type in:

lpd://192.168.0.5/<portname>

If you don't know what the portname is, read below.

Configuring Drivers

Choose printer manufactorer, and then model... Just like standard cups. Yada yada yada, goread the Gentoo printing guide ;)

Fire up your favorite browser, and head to http://localhost:631 (Replace localhost with the IP where your cups server lives. Note that you have to edit cups.conf for the remote server to allow access to the admin interface).

Choose "Manage Printers", and then "Add Printer". It will ask you for a password - give itthe root uname/pword.

In the address field, type in:

lpd://192.168.0.5/<portname>

If you don't know what the portname is, read below.

Misc.

There are a few gotchas for using the print server, which I have tried to list here.

All your portnames are belong to us

If the printserver has never been used before, then the portnames might not have been initialized. Thats a major showstopper - You will probably need a Windows installation somewhere to use D-Link's utility.

We get portname

If their already set up, but you just don't know what the portnames are, you might want to look around a preconfigured Windows installation (If there is one available), or simply use some application like smb4k or smbtree to list samba shares. The printserver is Dlink1, and you should be able to figure out the portnames with that information.

Other collected printserver info

(add your findings here!)
For a US Robotics USR8000 you have to use:

lpd://print.ser.vers.ip:515/lp


For a Belkin Wireless printer server (F1UP000) use:

lpd://192.168.2.253:515/lp1

(the ip shown is the standard configured ip).

For a Zonet ZPS3611 Print Server, use:

lpd://<ip>/lp1.  I had mine connected to a HP Deskjet 842C and I had to also make sure I emerged with the "ppds" USE flag so I got the hpjis driver for that model

For a Motorola Wireless print server (WPS870G) us:

lpd://XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/L1 ( Parallel port )
lpd://XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/L2 ( USB port )

For Brother MFC Printer with N9100h network-module use:

lpd://XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/binary_p1 (PostScript Level 3)

For a Dell 3100CN Printer: (should work with 3000CN too), get the drivers from the windows package, the HP laser drivers work but you don't have color

lpd://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/

For a Linksys Wired Print Server (PSUS4):

lpd://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/L1

For a Hawking Technology HPS12U use:

lpd://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/lpt1 ( Parallel port )
lpd://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/lpt2 ( USB port 1 )
lpd://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/lpt3 ( USB port 2 )
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Last modified: Thu, 04 Sep 2008 02:55:00 +0000 Hits: 10,039